Worksop: Lee Westwood’s video chat with school kids

Year 2 pupils at St Augustine's Primary School had a Skype session with golfer Lee Westwood, children asking Lee questions about his career (w131030-1d)

Year 2 pupils at St Augustine's Primary School had a Skype session with golfer Lee Westwood, children asking Lee questions about his career (w131030-1d)

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Youngsters chatted face to face with Worksop’s most famous export Lee Westwood via the medium of modern technology.

The year two pupils at St Augustine’s Primary School were thrilled when the golf superstar agreed to be interviewed on a Skype internet phone call.

He was grilled on topics including where he went to school in Worksop and what made him choose golf as a career.

Lee, who now lives in Florida, was speaking to the children from Shanghai, China, where he was playing in a competition.

“The children were very excited beforehand and they practiced their questions in preparation,” said year two teacher Laura Gee.

“About 15 children asked Lee a question. They were mostly based on where he went to school in Worksop, which was Sir Edmund Hillary, how he was introduced to golf and where he used to play in Worksop.”

“Lee was really friendly and funny and a little bit cheeky with some of the children which made them laugh.”

“Some of them said they were quite nervous beforehand because he is so famous but afterwards they said they enjoyed it.”

“One little asked Lee if he could remember playing golf with his mum and uncle, and Lee said yes and remembered that his uncle’s name was Simon. That was quite special for the little boy - he was thrilled.”

Mrs Gee said that Lee had Tweeted the school afterwards saying: “Thanks to Mrs Gee and year 2 for a great question time on Skype. Much better questions than the usual press conferences!”

The interview formed part of a topic the class is working on looking at famous people from Worksop.

Last half term they studied Mr Straw, a Worksop greengrocer whose 1920s family home is captured in time as a museum just off Blyth Road.

The next obvious choice was Lee Westwood. And the children even went for a golf lesson on Lee’s old course at Kilton Forest Golf Club.

Said Mrs Gee: “They did some putting and chopping, learning how to hold the club and how hard to hit the ball. Everyone joined in and learned a lot.”