Police and ambulance bosses warn of nuisance calls dangers after woman receives order

Megan Ayscough, from Worksop, has been given a criminal behaviour order for being a nuisance to the mergency services in Nottinghamshire

Megan Ayscough, from Worksop, has been given a criminal behaviour order for being a nuisance to the mergency services in Nottinghamshire

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Police and ambulance bosses have warned of the dangers of making nuisance emergency calls after a Worksop woman was handed an order for “wasting valuable resources and time”.

Megan Ayscough, of Anston Avenue, was given the two-year criminal behaviour order after continously making unnecessary 999 calls. The 22-year-old must now comply with a number of conditions as part of the order or she could face a prison sentence.

PC Julie Armstrong, from Worksop Police Station, said: “I am pleased that the judge has given a criminal behaviour order to a woman who needs to learn that this kind of behaviour is unacceptable.”

“Megan Anyscough has made numerous calls to the emergency services asking for them to attend. When they do attend she cannot be found. This wastes valuable resources and time when we can be helping people who really need it.”

Nottingham Crown Court heard the order bans Ayscough from calling NHS Direct or the emergency services for medical advice, or getting someone else to call on her behalf, unless she is in genuine need of an emergency.

It also bans her from leaving any location specified during any call requiring genuine need of emergency services.

Deborah Scothern, high volume service lead for East Midlands Ambulance Service, said: “We take it very seriously when people abuse the 999 system, while an ambulance crew or call-taker are dealing with someone who has no medical need they aren’t able to help someone who may be having a heart attack or stroke.

“We go above and beyond to support people who frequently call 999 to try and identify what support they need, this can be facilitating access to community services or addiction schemes. In some cases, despite our best efforts they are not inspired to change so we work with the police and action is taken.”