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Shipwreck survey off Scarborough

Scarborough Sub Auqa Club members. Pictured: Standing - Sandra Laverack, Anne Morrison (treasurer & membship secretary), Heath Samples (boat officer & diving officer), Duane Jackson and Iain Scott (Secretary).Front Row - Tony Snelson, Stu Law, Ian Abraham, Sara Flowers and Mick Lawson.

Scarborough Sub Auqa Club members. Pictured: Standing - Sandra Laverack, Anne Morrison (treasurer & membship secretary), Heath Samples (boat officer & diving officer), Duane Jackson and Iain Scott (Secretary).Front Row - Tony Snelson, Stu Law, Ian Abraham, Sara Flowers and Mick Lawson.

Major underwater shipwreck survey is being carried out by a team of Scarborough scuba divers.

The ambitious project, which will be carried out by members of the newly-formed South Bay SCUBA Scarborough branch of the British Sub-Aqua Club (BSAC), will include around 20 shipwrecks between Flamborough and Whitby and will map and record their exact positions.

The underwater mission will include three wrecks which have yet to be identified and explore the tragic tale of the fishing trawler Skegness which sank in September 1935 with the loss of all 11 crew men aboard.

There will also be an exploratory dive on the British merchant steamer, the Ella Sayer, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in April 1918.

The survey has been made possible thanks to a £1,150 grant from the BSAC Jubilee Trust which was set up almost 40 years ago to financially support the organisation’s clubs with a variety of interesting and worthwhile scuba diving projects.

News of the grant came after club members recently won a £10,000 Sport England grant which they have used to buy the club’s own Mitchell 31 dive boat.

One of the founding members of the club is Anne Morrison, 62, who is also treasurer and membership secretary and gained the grant from the Jubilee Trust.

Anne said: “I’m really grateful to BSAC for the Jubilee Trust grant which means we can look at the size of the wrecks along this stretch of coast. Some of these wrecks are quite well dived while others are only visited on very rare occasions.

“We want to record any notable features, the size of the wrecks, their position, orientation and condition. All the information will be carefully recorded and given, together with any photography and video we obtain, to Scarborough’s Maritime Heritage Group and used to enhance a display they putting together later in the year.”

Anne added: “I think it’s a good time to start the survey as last year’s winter’s storms really churned up the sea. There has been so much movement of sand on the seabed and there are a lot of things that have been uncovered, features that were previously buried beneath the seabed.”

 
 
 

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