Harworth: Protected peregrine falcons will benefit from new nesting site

Pictured left to right are Bill Grayson, Andrew Lowe, Glenn Mather, Mark Speck and Shaun McCahill of the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust and Harworth Estates
Pictured left to right are Bill Grayson, Andrew Lowe, Glenn Mather, Mark Speck and Shaun McCahill of the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust and Harworth Estates

A pair of endangered peregrine falcons will benefit from a brand new nesting site at All Saints Church in Harworth.

A specially built nesting box was installed on Thursday, January 21 to replace a previous nesting site on the pit tower at the former Harworth Colliery.

A Peregrine Falcon

A Peregrine Falcon

It is hoped the birds of prey, which are an endangered species due to pesticide poisoning in the 1970s, will multiply in the area.

Speaking about the project, conservation officer Mark Speck said: “We are delighted to be working with the All Saints Church and Harworth Estates to provide these spectacular birds with an alternative nest site to one they’ve used previously on the pit tower.

“There was a great atmosphere on site yesterday with everyone pulling together to make this happen and we look forward to being able to see peregrines in the area for many years to come.”

The new nest site has been arranged in partnership with the All Saints Harworth church and Harworth estates, the company responsible for the redevelopment of the former colliery site.

CAPTIONS:

NWGU-29-01-16 falcon 1: Pictured left to right are Bill Grayson, Andrew Lowe, Glenn Mather, Mark Speck and Shaun McCahill of the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust and Harworth Estates

NWGU-29-01-16 falcon 2: ill Grayson, Andrew Lowe, Glenn Mather, Mark Speck and Shaun McCahill of the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust and Harworth Estates with Ann Wilson the Harworth Church warden

NWGU-29-01-16 peregrine falcon: The Peregrine Falcon became an endangered species due to pesticide poisoning in the 1970s